torsdag 19. juli 2018

Rabies and Mass Poisonings: Ukraine’s Genocidal Healthcare “Reform” Claims More and More Victims


Translated by Ollie Richardson & Angelina Siard  STALKERZONE
19/07/2018

The mass poisoning of children happened at the “Yastrebok” children’s camp in the village of Sosnovoye in the Lyman district of the Donetsk region [controlled by the UAF – ed]. Over two days, on July 17th and 18th, 84 people were hospitalised including 68 children, reports the State service for emergency situations of Ukraine…

The preliminary diagnosis was a acute intestinal infection. Children aged from 9 to 16 started to feel bad after dinner on Monday, July 16th. They felt unwell, they had a temperature and nausea. Children were hospitalised in the hospitals of Slavyansk, Kramatorsk, and Lyman. The prosecutor’s office began an investigation into this mass poisoning.

Lacking a sanitary epidemiological service


Such cases in Ukraine are not a rarity. At the beginning of July of 12th children were poisoned at the “Slavutich” camp in Kiev region. A special commission revealed numerous violations, then the camp was closed. At the same time it should be noted that already in March, 2017 the resolution of the Cabinet of Ministers liquidated the State sanitary epidemiological service that safeguarded the health of citizens.


At the time there was even the assumption on social networks that the government allegedly pursues the aim of “cleansing the territory” … of the population. Especially as talk about reforming the State sanitary epidemiological service (which ended with the liquidation of the service) was ongoing against a serious epidemic of a combined intestinal infection, which in the summer of 2016 hundreds of inhabitants of the Izmail district in the south of the Odessa region suffered from. Back then a state of emergency was declared in the city. The Ukrainian media noted that such a large-scale epidemic happened for the first time in many years.


However, the decision to liquidation the State sanitary epidemiological service was all the same made, and the government justified it in its resolution as follows: “The further functioning of the State sanitary epidemiological service is inexpedient, because nowadays the implementation of its functions is ensured by the Ministry of Healthcare, State inspection service for compliance with labour legislation, and the State Food Service”.

Mysterious poisoning in Cherkassy

 

And now in Ukraine it isn’t always possible to even establish the cause of such mass poisoning. Thus, in May the mass poisoning of children took place during morning assembly at school No.8 in Cherkassy. According to the principal Tatyana Sayenko, during morning assembly the children started fainting. School students and parents told journalists of the Cherkassy TV company “VIKKA” that panic began during the morning assembly.


The victims were so numerous that the first-aid post was overflowed, children were placed in the dining room and corridors. At the time 53 school students and three teachers were hospitalised, and 11 children and one adult were taken to intensive care.


The resonance was such that the Prime Minister of Ukraine Vladimir Groisman, the Acting Minister of Healthcare Ulana Suprun, and the head of the Civil service for emergency situations Nikolay Chechetkin quickly came to Cherkassy. The meeting of the operational HQ created to investigate the causes of the incident.


Back then Groisman named the local dispersion of a certain substance during assembly as the preliminary cause of the incident (although no harmful substances were found either in the air or in the water). The Civil service for emergency situations also considered the possibility of evaporation from the sewage collector. The cause of the mysterious poisoning still haven’t been established.


Similar incidents took place in Krivoy Rog (four students fainted during a parade) and in Novomoskovsk in the Dnepropetrovsk region — there during an assembly 16 pupils of different ages fell ill.

Healthcare reform: “it is simply fantasy”


While doctors in hospitals fight for the health of the poisoned children, the acting Minister of Healthcare of Ukraine Ulana Suprun continues to entertain citizens with her reasoning and advice: either fluorography became outdated, either it is necessary to use shoe covers in medical institutions, etc.


This time she informed “natives” about what they should do if they are bitten by a dog… It is necessary information, but is stating truisms really the function of the head of the Ministry of Healthcare?


However, in Ukraine Ulana Suprun is criticised not so much for her “useful tips” as for the healthcare reform that started in April of this year, meaning, in fact, the refusal of free medicine.


Earlier parliamentarians voted for the beginning of reform – and with violations of regulations at that.

“Following the demands of the IMF, the Rada, via the votes of the cartel party in power, took a step in the direction of completely shifting the burden of the costs for the maintenance of medicine onto the shoulders of citizens,” stated the political scientist Andrey Zolotarev, characterising the behavior of people’s deputies.

In general, if you have money, then you will be cured (maybe), but if you don’t have any money, then just die… Isn’t this the reason that the numerous critics of Suprun call her “Doctor Death”?


But we will note, to be fair, that it’s not Suprun who is personally the reason for all these troubles: the country simply has no money to provide its citizens with free medicine. And most citizens have no money in order to use chargeable medicine… In general, the government option of “commercial” medical reform is a real catastrophe.


The People’s Deputy, the head of the committee of the Verkhovna Rada concerning healthcare Olga Bogomolets, who participated in the 2014 presidential elections, offered her version of reforming the healthcare system, having determined increasing the average life expectancy of Ukrainians up to 80 (currently it is 71) due to the decline in mortality from heart attacks, strokes, and oncological and other dangerous diseases as an aim.


According to her, the implementation of such reform requires an increase in the financing of healthcare to the sum of 100 billion hryvnia per year (at least) and the introduction of obligatory medical insurance.


But where can such money be found in the ruined Ukraine? There is no money for the reform itself either. Earlier the president of the All-Ukrainian council for defending the rights and safety of patients Viktor Serdyuk stated that providing “just 8 or 10 dollars a year per Ukrainian for all healthcare services is simply fantasy”.


Taking into account all other factors, it is necessary to assume: most likely, the mysterious poisoning and epidemics of seemingly ancient infections is only the beginning…